GUESS THE PUB GOES FOR A BASS TASTER

Yes, a lovely looking pub, but tasters ? For Bass ?

A quart is a taster, surely ?

Perhaps the most obscure clue ever to the location of our mystery pub;

My second Superman clue in a week, fact fans.

It’s twinned with a French coal mining town whose Wiki entries claims “an extremely old tree” as a place of interest.

At the risk of making this too easy, the main bar in that French town looks like this;

Back in England we have no net curtains here, but Bass tasters and a trio of trios.

3 museums, 3 recent Beer Guide entries, and 3 distinct areas to the parish, one of them a “lost” village that looks like this;

Here’s yet another locational clue from inside the pub. Where’s Life After Football when you need him ?

Inside you have that lovely sight of blokes at the bar, blokes at the benches, and a hidden bloke behind the wall waiting for lunch.

All too easy, I think, so I’ll award the prize to whoever can identify the album cover below.

And then sing the Christmas hit it contains.

39 thoughts on “GUESS THE PUB GOES FOR A BASS TASTER

  1. “but tasters ? For Bass ?”

    Basters! (Fen for bastards?) ๐Ÿ˜‰

    “A quart is a taster, surely ?”

    Blimey. I’ve been doing it wrong.

    “Perhaps the most obscure clue ever to the location of our mystery pub;”

    I’m out! Heck, if this is the most obscure I have no bloody hope do I?

    “Itโ€™s twinned with a French coal mining town”

    Oop north then. ๐Ÿ™‚

    “At the risk of making this too easy, the main bar in that French town looks like this;”

    I got the town from that by using Google. ๐Ÿ™‚
    (yay me!)

    “Back in England we have no net curtains here, but Bass tasters and a trio of trios.”

    Having no luck trying to Google twin Bully. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    “Whereโ€™s Life After Football when you need him ?”

    Having a pint at home in his underpants?

    “and a hidden bloke behind the wall waiting for lunch.”

    That’s the name of one of the meals? Worse than bloody toad in the hole that is.

    “All too easy, I think, so Iโ€™ll award the prize to whoever can identify the album cover below.”

    I’m out (again!).

    “And then sing the Christmas hit it contains.”

    Phew! Dodged a bullet there!

    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Having failed miserably at guessing all the pubs, to date, I thought I’d better get in quick with the LP title. Below the Salt wasn’t as good as Parcel of Rogues which, I believe, preceeded it.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Well done Paul.

      I did wonder if it would be something folksy. I was going to work through them starting with the Pogues.

      But that was pretty pacy-pacy.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. T’oher Paul,
      “Salt” – and Thomas Salt’s brewery was at 119 High Street, Burton on Trent until being taken over by Bass, Ratcliff and Gretton in 1927 so that’s the connection with Draught Bass !

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Stafford Paul, there is a smashing Thomas Salt pub mirror, hanging on the wall at the Anglesea Arms, South Kensington.

        The Anglesea is one of the original, pioneering real ale pubs in the capital, which I had the pleasure of visiting, for the first time in 1974. Pleased to report that it hasnโ€™t changed much in 45 years โ€“ my last visit was in 2019!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. T’other Paul,
        Yes, I remember the Anglesea Arms for beers like Bass and Ruddles back in 1974 but i don’t think nineteen year olds have ever taken much notice of pub mirrors.
        I’ve heard that the two magnificent mirrors in the Tipperary, Fleet Street have been removed for sale to a museum in Ireland during lockdown despite that being illegal from the pub’s Grade II listing. .

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I found the pub, but owing to what I assume to be an oversight in one of Martin’s pics.

    Is the comic cover a reference to the village down the road?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oversight ? How very dare you. Everything in these posts is rigorously researched and the sent to my Quality Control team.

      Yes, anyone with a 99p magnifying glass can read the mats on the table but where’s the fun in that when you’ve got obscure lost villages to work out ?

      Like

      1. Ah yes, all is clear now. It’s actually written on the table, not the mats. Sounds good: “very much a village local with more mature clientele appreciating the quiet cosy ambience.” ๐Ÿ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’ve been to 3 very good pubs in Ruddington doing the GBG but the Victoria wasn’t one of them. There’s some strong pubs between Nottingham/Bridgford and Leicester, though classics bar the Red Lion in Kegworth.

        Like

    2. Was struggling – till pointed in direction of the pub’s name being in view,,, which can be of some help in a Guess the Pub competition.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I suspect there’s some fancy software that could have blotted it out but I’d hate to get a reputation for technical proficiency. And there must be dozens of pubs called The Chandlers Chalice in the UK ?

        Like

      1. Can never hear/read coquille St Jaques without remembering Willy Rushton’s description of it as ‘fish in an ash-tray’

        Liked by 1 person

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