CLOUGHIE IN SKEGNESS

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An exciting report of a trip outside Cambridge to come. But first another raiding of the archives to bring you the time that Brian Clough’s Forest competed for the Skegness Paper Bag trophy (possibly), romping to a 4-0 win even without Shilton.

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A week later, Forest won 3-1 at Goodison, went top of the League, and the rest is history.

No doubt a weekend in Skeggy on the Bateman’s, Bass and Worthington was just the boost that Kenny Burns, Martin O’Neill and Peter Withe needed.

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1977 – as good as real ale got

Perhaps they stayed at The Vine, for many years the top Skeggy hotel.

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Vine well away from the fuss
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Top windows

When Mrs RM and I stayed here for £50 (fifty !) back in 1999, it just seemed an old-fashioned Best Western.

Twenty years later Curry Charles and I visited and it seemed like an old fashioned Best Western with a proper public bar.

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Blokes, darts, curry, beer

The busiest pub by far on a cold Thursday night in March, and clearly selling more Batemans than the rest of Skeggy put together.  These folk had clearly trudged past 17 fun pubs to get here and drink BBB.

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Turnover !

Alongside restaurants of increasing formality in the other three rooms, there was an Indian menu in the bar.  There is no better beer to wash down a Chicken Dhansak than XB (NBSS 3.5+), though the maltier XXXB was a bit of a challenge. Yummy.

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Proper fire

Back in 2018 Charles insisted on visiting all the fun pubs, speculating on what Tony Woodcock had got up to in Busters and the Spoons back in ’77.

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Fun
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Quite an elegant Spoons, all things told

Before we’d got to Skeg, the gent at the Consortium micro warned us;

Your chances of getting run over by a mobility scooter by an old bloke in a moleskin fleece are high !”

He was right.

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Well, golf buggy

We had a great overnighter in the Jewel of the East. £33 per room at the North Shore Golf Hotel, top coastal walking.  The “Adopt your own wind power generator” scheme is a winner.

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We adopted the one 5th from the left.

15 minutes walk to the funfair.  Mind the starfish.

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Scary
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Old Skool fun
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Vegas on the cheap

As we’ve seen already, decent beer IS available.  And the pubs were full of drinkers.  All human life is here, and not just in the Spoons.

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Craft beer has arrived

Unfortunately for Charles, Bizzy Lizzie’s Whip & Dip Parlour turned out to be less exciting than promised.

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Diddy donuts

A short walk north takes you to a stream of caravan parks, each with their own craft bar and gourmet food.

THE SKEGNESS MONSTER
Flat roof heaven

My new Guide pub was the Seathorne Arms, Skeggy’s first since BRAPA was in short trousers, was an unexpected corker.

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A great sign

It’s more social club than fun pub, packed with retired gentlefolk, fluorescent jackets and girls with prosecco in a bucket.  A proper pub.

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Well dressed gentlefolk

The Heritage was cool and silky (NBSS 3.5), and flying out at £2.50 a pint.  The Hen was going quicker.

And of course, as Charles noted, tremendous lacings.

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A great English seaside holiday. Just not this year, I suspect.

11 thoughts on “CLOUGHIE IN SKEGNESS

  1. That takes me back – I used to drink in Nottingham’s Falcon, Canning Circus, back in the day when I still had close ties with the city, and would sometimes stray over to the Hand and Heart on Derby Road. There was often the odd Forest player in there, notably Trevor Francis, at least in the early 1980s, I seem to remember.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. From a beer point of view the Falcon wasn’t really that brilliant back then. It was a Shipstone’s pub, but often failed to keep a memorable pint.

        However, in the things that really matter, it was brilliant.

        The Hand was about as fashionable as a pub could be. Young – and not-so-young – ladies would go to meet chaps who lived in Nottingham’s nearby salubrious and exclusive Park estate.

        Like

      1. Yes, the Crown in Beeston, through to the Royal Oak at Ockbrook, with plenty of others on the way.

        Happy days.

        Like

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