UP AND ATTERCLIFFE

From Greenland to Attercliffe to complete a magical afternoon. The only things that would have made it better would have been a) A pint in any of the John Smiths pub and/or b) A Lamb Handi curry in one of Attercliffe’s many curry houses.

But it was enough, that day, to explore a suburb I’d always bypassed (by the A6109) on the route from Meadowhall to The Valley of Beer.

Known for industry and closed pubs nowadays, but a century ago home to high class shops and cinemas. Yes, Burton was once a high class shop. You can tell that from the (broken) “Swansea” on the window.

Yes, Attercliffe is the Rotherham of the, er, west (?).

Some people like to visit places they know and love, year after year after year. But I just want to wake up each morning in a different town and explore all day.

This stroll was a joy. What Pub reveals a treasure chest of pubs when you include closed and keg pubs.

But zoom in, limit your search to open (pre-Lockdown) pubs serving real ale, and your map looks very different;

The only real ale pub is the Sportsman, the one that sold Will a pint for Β£1.10 less than a decade ago. Read into that what you will.

My magic spreadsheet says I’d been to the Cocked Hat (R.I.P.),

and the Carlton, very much alive despite the rumours spread by the Sheffield Star.

Sadly, the Don Valley Hotel appears to have become a members club to keep me out of karaoke night.

Loads to explore when we’re allowed out again.

And if all that doesn’t drag you out from Kelham Island with your fancy vegan bakes, the Smallest Carrot Company should do the trick.

8 thoughts on “UP AND ATTERCLIFFE

  1. The Carlton used to be a must-visit pub for its well-kept real ales. I think four or five at one time, and I remember going there with some of my Luton mates when we played against Rotherham at the Don Valley Stadium in the FA Cup (28th November 2009). Don’t ask me what the score was, but the pub was busy and when a beer went off it was immediately replaced. Of course, it’s a long way to come from Rotherham (and Luton, for that matter). My review of 2018 has only one beer on, and now WhatPub is saying ‘no real ale’.

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    1. Yes, proper shops those, and I’ve noticed that the Stafford one has a foundation stone laid by Montague Burton some date in the 1930s I think.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. “or b) A Lamb Handi”

    Good think I read on and saw ‘curry’ otherwise I might have made an inappropriate comment! πŸ˜‰

    “Yes, Burton was once a high class shop. ”

    Is that Burton tailors? I think my dad worked in one of their shops part time on the weekend when we lived in the UK from 1959 to 1964.

    “But I just want to wake up each morning in a different town and explore all day.”

    So… you’ll be moving again soon then? πŸ˜‰

    “But zoom in, limit your search to open (pre-Lockdown) pubs serving real ale, and your map looks very different;”

    Blimey.

    “Sadly, the Don Valley Hotel appears to have become a members club to keep me out of karaoke night.”

    Either that, or Mrs RM’s reputation has preceded her. πŸ™‚

    “And if all that doesn’t drag you out from Kelham Island with your fancy vegan bakes, the Smallest Carrot Company should do the trick.”

    Do they make the smallest carrots or are they the smallest company that makes carrots? πŸ˜‰

    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, Burton tailors. A lot of Art Deco buildings in the UK.

      Ah, so YOU’RE to blame for the collapse of the British Empire from 59 to 64 ?

      We shan’t be moving house, just moving our campervan (though I really fancy a night away in a Premier Inn somewhere interesting).

      They definitely make the smallest carrot; I think they talk gently to them.

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      1. “Ah, so YOU’RE to blame for the collapse of the British Empire from 59 to 64 ?”

        Me! I was too busy picking up a posh English accent so I could be the Master of Ceremonies in the December of 1964 for the Christmas show at my new school in Canada. πŸ™‚

        Cheers

        Liked by 1 person

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