TAKING OUR SUNSHINE TO LEITH

The third pub of our quartet of new Edinburgh ticks took us to Leith, which you’ll know from the Proclaimers song “Throw the R away” (“r” is real ale scoring less than NBSS 2).

The seaside suburb is a scintillating mix of seagulls, sand and sewage works.

A mix of high rise,

high church,

and high flying birds (not Noel G).

The street named simply Shore is home to some great pubs,

none of which I let Mrs RM go in.

For my tick was round the bend, at a place called Henry Hall’s Carriers Quarters in the Guide, but Henry himself has been banished from all signage I saw, possibly for a goalkeeping error. Expect Si to be confused.

A typically tiny town boozer, tinny R & B and all,

where the only seats were on the ledge against the window. Uncomfortable, but with no standing it was all I had. The snug, with mystery leg, looked very alluring;

We were invited to read a list of rules that Mrs RM was still grappling with as we left. Covid has knocked the spirit out of many pubs, but at least it has knocked beer ranges down to manageable size.

The Edinburgh Gold is the cask beer of choice it seems, though Peroni ruled in the Carriers. This wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t great either, and we shuffled out, seeking out a more comfortable seat.

We found one, almost immediately.

7 thoughts on “TAKING OUR SUNSHINE TO LEITH

  1. Hi Martin, looking at the route you took, on the map, you didn’t follow the path that runs alongside the Water of Leith. It’s a nice walk in summer, but perhaps not so nice in late December.

    A nice little pub there, but with standing verboten, not one for settling down in and enjoying a session on the ale!

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    1. Bing or Google Maps won’t let you mark that walking route on the map, Paul, but we did the urban route this time. I last did the Water a few years ago, starting at the excellent modern art museum. As you say, a lovely walk.

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  2. The snug is reputedly where a “lady of the night” would sit advertising her wares to the passing sailors in times gone by.

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