“El-se-ca”

On the Friday we made our second campervan excursion of the season.

Somehow, I persuaded Mrs RM to spend a night in a mining village (pronounced “El-se-ca” by locals) on the edge of Barnsley.

Apart from being debonair and dashing, us pub tickers are noted for our extraordinary knowledge of UK geography. The cluster of towns and villages between Junction 36 of the M1 and Junction 37 of the A1(M) would make a challenging Mastermind subject.

GBG entries in Hoyland, Birdwell, Harley, Jump, Hemingfield, Wombwell, Milton and Elsecar have delighted us with their grit and grandeur, and confused us with their changeable Beer Guide listing.

Hoyland is the main town, and Brad is our main man;

“There’s nowt such thing as bad beer, it’s just they that keep it that spoil it”

I hope Brad is OK; I must pop back and have another keg Magnet.

But on Friday, our target was the (outer) car park of the Elsecar Heritage Museum, which contains Barnsley’s major bona fide tourist attraction*.

Folks some here for steam train days, Newcomen beam engine (?), teacakes, and an antiques centre selling cutlery recovered from Wombwell secondary schools in the 1970s.

It also sold the garden furniture that lasted us 14 years, and remained in Waterbeach when we moved at Christmas.

But 3 years ago it became best known for its own GBG entry, the beer shop-cum-cafe Maison du Biere taunting Simon and I with its Key Keg/keg dilemma.

I got there first and my frankly lovely report is here. 3 months later BRAPA got over the shock of his £5.20 pint and focused on the key issues;

 Did you see her twerking?”  So glad that my view was obscured, no one wants a dog in the Miley Cyrus mould, not even in Elsecar.

Talking of twerking, Mrs RM was easily convinced to bag an outside table in the rambling garden (dodging the pooches) and delay our onward rail journey.

Ggggrrrrrrrrrrmmmmph” is the best way I can describe the sound that came as Mrs RM landed on the seated keg barrel. Everyone turned to look;

You don’t get mildly embarrassing noises sitting on honest-to-goodness barrels of real ale, I can tell you.

There’s 3 things to note;

The waitress really knew her stuff; stick, styles, strengths (“The strongest one please !” said someone).

Pressure Drop from That London and Jaipur from That Bakewell were superb, in plastic glasses that didn’t seem to diminish the taste. The Jaipur was an easy NBSS 4.

Those plastic glasses were a refundable £2 each, and as we couldn’t catch the attention of anyone to return them we left them as an eco-charitable donation, which made it an expensive 20 minutes.

It would have been cheaper here, in times gone past;

That sign would look great outside our house, you know. Perhaps it’ll end up in the antiques centre at Elsecar eventually.

*excluding the Dickie Bird jumper exhibition at Jump, obviously.

13 thoughts on ““El-se-ca”

      1. Quite a few German beer gardens charge a deposit on glasses, but given the fact they are serious drinking vessels, and rather attractive to the light-fingered, it’s quite understandable
        🍺

        Like

  1. ‘…antiques centre selling cutlery recovered from Wombwell secondary schools in the 1970s.’

    Or it could be one of those dangerous knife (fork and spoon) amnesty collection points…?

    ‘…the sound that came as Mrs RM landed on the seated keg barrel’

    Probably ‘extraneous’ carbon dioxide (from the keg I hasten to add) – though with key kegs the extraneous gas is in the outer plastic keg and not in contact with the beer in the inner bag – so CAMRA will be happy that it their ‘real ale’ standards have not been adversely affected. But you know all that from ‘Discourse’ I suppose 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “Or it could be one of those dangerous knife (fork and spoon) amnesty collection points…?”

      Much better than what I penned. 🙂

      “Probably ‘extraneous’ carbon dioxide (from the keg I hasten to add) ”

      (slow golf clap)

      Cheers

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  2. “(pronounced “El-se-ca” by locals) on the edge of Barnsley.”

    (squints at map)

    So, how do they determine ‘upper’ and ‘lower’ this and that? Is it a cardinal direction thing or determined by elevation?

    “Apart from being debonair and dashing,”

    There’s that famed sarcasm again.

    “There’s nowt such thing as bad beer, it’s just they that keep it that spoil it”

    Very deep that.

    “I hope Brad is OK; I must pop back and have another keg Magnet.”

    What! No John Smith’s Extra Smooth?

    “which contains Barnsley’s major bona fide tourist attraction*.”

    I’m guessing it’s not the reservoir.

    “and an antiques centre selling cutlery recovered from Wombwell secondary schools in the 1970s.”

    Which was mainly due to lunch time knife fights?

    “It also sold the garden furniture that lasted us 14 years, and remained in Waterbeach when we moved at Christmas.”

    They say you can take the furniture out of the garden, but you can’t take the garden out of the furniture.

    ” “Did you see her twerking?” So glad that my view was obscured, no one wants a dog in the Miley Cyrus mould, not even in Elsecar.”

    And two years later we have Glen Close twerking. What is the world coming to?

    ““Ggggrrrrrrrrrrmmmmph” is the best way I can describe the sound that came as Mrs RM landed on the seated keg barrel. Everyone turned to look;”

    I don’t know whether to do an LOL, (slow golf clap) or simply ask where to send flowers for your funeral. 🙂

    “The Jaipur was an easy NBSS 4.”

    That’s in my top 5 beers to have if I ever get over there.

    “Those plastic glasses were a refundable £2 each, and as we couldn’t catch the attention of anyone to return them we left them as an eco-charitable donation, which made it an expensive 20 minutes.”

    Yikes! Puts a bit of a damper on the visit.

    “That sign would look great outside our house, you know. Perhaps it’ll end up in the antiques centre at Elsecar eventually.”

    Indeed. And I’m sure that nearby is a pub called Clothiers Rest. 😉

    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

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