GUESS THE PUB CROSSES THE BORDER

Ah, but WHICH border ? The Rutland border ? The Cheshire border at Heaton Chapel ?

You can probably tell from the decor in this Victorian gem.

At least ONE of the bands whose albums grace this famed rock pub are relatively local, and it’s not Aerosmith.

It’s a bit of an identikit town, but if I give you a pic of the High Street you’d look up the name on Google. So here’s some harder clues from 2020 and c.1890.

Not a great town; it’s most famous resident an unlikely teetotaller. If you take HIS name and the name of the pub you might end up with this;

Oh, and if you’re still stuck on the town, the numbers 4 and 2 are the most important in their history, numbers that broke many hearts.

49 thoughts on “GUESS THE PUB CROSSES THE BORDER

      1. Thanks SH. I should have gone with my first instincts after tracing the general locality of the bands on the chalk board. The town in question, for its size, has always had a thriving live music scene, and a number of of bands from there have enjoyed some success.

        It was Martin’s clue about the famous but unlikely teetotaller that clinched it for me though.

        Liked by 1 person

      1. I assumed a traumatic loss for Kilmarnock at the footie, but couldn’t find any references from a (rather brief) online search. Perhaps after all they were the last side to realise that 4-4-2 is a pretty crappy system.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I think it might refer to the 1964/5 season when the leagues were still decided on goal average. Hearts could afford to lose by one goal but lost 0-2 at home to Killie, meaning Killie won the league by 0.042 goal average? By 1985/6 goal difference was the rule. In that season Hearts managed to lose the last game of the season 0-2 at Dundee to allow Celtic to win the league on GD. Hearts would have won both times if the rules were reversed.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Brilliant – no, I found it by guessing that the unlikely teetotaller was Johnnie Walker and looked at his Wiki page.

      I also looked at pictures of town centre statues in Scotland, but that one of Sir James Shaw 1st Baronet has been moved to a nearby leafy spot, I found afterwards.

      The last picture is of the headless Fanny and Johnnie Craddock – I deduce – TV chefs of the 1960s and 1970s, Dave, famous for Johnnie’s closing line “and I hope all your doughnuts turn out like Fannies”.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. And, as they say in poker, I’m out (before I even begin to guess). 🙂

    “At least ONE of the bands whose albums grace this famed rock pub are relatively local, and it’s not Aerosmith.”

    And not the Eagles. There, I’ve narrowed it down for someone else!

    “So here’s some harder clues from 2020 and c.1890.”

    So, either Bagshot (from the trousers photo) or pickles (from the 1890 photo as that has to be Gherkin and Son in the upper left).

    “it’s most famous resident an unlikely teetotaller.”

    Egad! Someone can be famous for that?

    “If you take HIS name and the name of the pub you might end up with this;”‘

    Gobbles galore?
    (I had no idea Hitler’s propaganda minister was born in the UK!) 😉

    “Oh, and if you’re still stuck on the town, the numbers 4 and 2 are the most important in their history, numbers that broke many hearts.”

    I’m guessing that’s a footy reference.

    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “The town is also home to this memorable cultural icon, which will give Russ a chuckle 😉”

    Indeed it does!

    Even though, over here, Fanny means the backside, not the frontside. 😉

    Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. “Crosses the border” reminds me of

    This is the night mail crossing the Border,
    Bringing the cheque and the postal order,
    Letters for the rich, letters for the poor,
    The shop at the corner, the girl next door.
    Pulling up Beattock, a steady climb:
    The gradient’s against her, but she’s on time.
    Past cotton-grass and moorland boulder
    Shovelling white steam over her shoulder,
    Snorting noisily as she passes
    Silent miles of wind-bent grasses.
    Birds turn their heads as she approaches,
    Stare from bushes at her blank-faced coaches.
    Sheep-dogs cannot turn her course;
    They slumber on with paws across.
    In the farm she passes no one wakes,
    But a jug in a bedroom gently shakes.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s