MOVING HOUSE – HOW HARD CAN IT BE ?

I said I’d reflect on the joys and traumas of moving house, and since this blog is my diary it would be daft not to.

Put simply, the relocation from Cambridge to Sheffield would be some way down my list of Magic Memories, even below the hell of the 67th to 91st minutes at the Etihad on 13.5.12 and a Polish Midnight Mass (2 hours, no Christmas carols) in 2016.

You’ll know, if you read this stuff rather than just looking at the pics of lacings and mobility scooters, that we’ve been planning an escape from the flatlands to the hills for years.

Look! There’s a hill right outside our door!

It leads to a ski slope, a red light area and a microbrewery. A lethal combination.

The move allows us to be close to our two lads and the bright lights of Sheffield and Manchester, if they’re ever switched on again.

Sheffield also has fast WiFi so Mrs RM can work from home, as well as drinking IPAs from plastic cups in between redecoration and walks to leftie vegan shops (her words).

But a fortnight ago I didn’t think I’d be moving. Ever.

We accepted an offer on our house in mid August, from a lovely couple enticed by proximity to our great local boozer and artisan pizzeria (and possibly school and London links).

House “sold”, we headed to Sheffield, looked at three places and had an offer accepted in early September on a house between Hillsborough and Kelham Island.

And then we waited. And signed documents. And waited. And waited. Our buyers were desperate to move in before Christmas. Covid had slowed conveyancing down to a crawl.

And then in mid November, 4 months later, our buyers started asking questions about a little tree next door and asked if they could dig up our foundations to check the depth.

The suggestion that a little (unidentified) tree over the fence might cause our house to collapse (never mind our move) prompted me to spend a weekend digging up the path to prove roots weren’t invading our house, and a specialist tree surgeon identified a harmless Hazel tree to put the buyers mind at rest.

Having fixed a date, we then had 11 days to move our gear (mostly shoes and LPs) into storage so Mrs RM could clean the house before we left.

TEN trips to Big Yellow Storage in 11 days followed, leaving about 27 minutes to clean the oven and deliver the keys.

WHY oh why does the key have to be delivered to the centre of Cambridge? Or collected from the estate agent in Crookes without any parking for a bike, let alone a van ?

Organising your own move rather than paying professionals is SO much more fun.

But it’s over now, and I’m not moving ever again. Ever.

Not when there’s somewhere selling beer for £2.60 a pint on the doorstep.

48 thoughts on “MOVING HOUSE – HOW HARD CAN IT BE ?

      1. No, and it gave me the summer of 1974 working in the Hull Brewery.
        ( The Bass Charrington owned Joules Brewery in Stone didn’t take on temporary workers )

        Liked by 2 people

    1. When our two lads were 18 and 21, my wife and I moved almost 1,400km away! Mind you, we paid a year’s rent on a condominium for them. They both agreed it was a good move as it helped to take charge of their own lives. 🙂

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  1. “a ski slope, a red light area and a microbrewery. A lethal combination”, especially if you don’t think about which order to do them in. .

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Well done for managing to stay sane over the course of your move. Whoever says it’s one of the most stressful things you will encounter in life, is absolutely right.

    It was 27 years ago that we moved into our current house, and there were problems with access to the rear of the property, plus a query regarding guarantees on the damp-proofing work, carried out by the previous owners.

    Why does it always come down to those little last-minute snags (roots from a neighbouring tree, in your case), that solicitors and surveyors love to spring on you at the last minute? Probably to justify their enormous fees, is the answer to the latter, but there must be a simpler way to conduct business.

    The main thing is you are in and have the rest of your lives to explore and get to know the local area. No doubt your two boys will be glad to have you both a bit nearer, although I expect your parents will miss having you close by.

    I’m not sure where we will move to when the time comes. There was talk of a property overseas, but that’s a good idea until the whole Brexit mess is settled, and even then, it might not work out as we would have wished. Once young, master Matthew leaves the roost, there will be the opportunity to downsize – we don’t really need a four-bedroom house with two bathrooms and a large garden, but hey, ho!

    Still having trouble with WordPress, even though I DO have my own account, so will sign off as Kentish Paul.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I can recommend the Old Grindstone, if it ever reopens. It was the last pub I went to before Lockdpown 2. It’s run by Stancill Brewery on a short term lease from True North brewery, who bought it from Greene King. I’m not sure I’d recommend it so heartily once True North take it on themselves, as their beers cannot hold a candle to Stancill’s, in my opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, the Ball is Greene King’s one remaining pub in Crookes, but not one that I frequent these days (I mean pre-Covid obv). As for the Noah’s Ark, I don’t think I’ve ever had a decent pint there – last time I was there it was to watch a Luton Town game on the TV about five years ago, and if it hadn’t been for the football I would have asked for my money back and walked out. I’m pretty sure it was Doom Bar, or possibly Bombadier. Don’t know if it’s changed hands since; almost certainly, I reckon.

        Also in Crookes is the Masons Arms, just off the main street between the two already mentioned. It looked like it was on its last legs two or three years ago, but the pubco spruced it up and advertised the lease; I don’t know if it ever reopened. (WhatPub is not up to date and neither is Pubs Galore.)

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      2. Bombardier, served with foamy head in the Wrestlers in Cambridge or the industrial Midlands, was a reliable and enjoyable pint a decade or more ago. These days it suffers from lack of turnover and head.

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      3. Actually “Bombardier, served with foamy head in …… the industrial Midlands, was a reliable and enjoyable pint a decade or more ago” is ‘Bang On’.
        M&B Springfield Bitter was the cask beer in the most Stafford pubs during the 1970s and Bombardier was an appropriate replacement in the town’s proper one-beer-is-plenty pubs ten to twenty years ago.
        Not long back it was the one permanent beer in the Greyhound and in recent years it’s been the one cask beer in the Joiners Arms.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I put “Bombardier” into the search facility on my blog.
        It seems I had very good Bombardier twice last year, at the Earl Shilton Constitutional club and the Heworth in York, and a less thrilling pint 2 months ago on the edge of Kettering. A rare sight, to be sure.

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  4. I always thought we had one more “adventure ” in us after coming down here from Leeds but in all honesty I can’t face the trauma .Our house is right next to a wood & is built on a special raft to protect it from tree roots (this was an issue when we bought the house but as it was new it was easily sorted out -we still have the plans & paperwork to prove it ) I think we will stay put now unless our lad takes flight up North ! Your new area looks quite edgy compared to Waterbeach -don’t be scared

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    1. “Your new area looks quite edgy…” Trust me, he’s making special excursions to find bits of rough that he can photograph for this site. Sheffield’s gorgeous, really.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. “Put simply, the relocation from Cambridge to Sheffield would be some way down my list of Magic Memories”

    Having moved 7 times since I’ve been married, I can safely say that none of them were what one would call magical. 😉

    “It leads to a ski slope, a red light area and a microbrewery. A lethal combination.”

    (slow golf clap)

    “The move allows us to be close to our two lads”

    That would be one of the ONLY reasons we’d consider moving.*

    * – oh, ok… being near our only grandchild ranks right up there as well 🙂

    “as well as drinking IPAs from plastic cups in between redecoration”

    (nods) Judging from the photo that wallpaper has definitely got to go! 🙂

    “And then in mid November, 4 months later, ”

    Mid August to mid November is 3 months. Just saying. 😉

    “prompted me to spend a weekend digging up the path to prove roots weren’t invading our house, and a specialist tree surgeon identified a harmless Hazel tree to put the buyers mind at rest.”

    (sigh)

    “we then had 11 days to move our gear (mostly shoes and LPs) into storage so Mrs RM could clean the house before we left.”

    Our final move while still in the Canadian military found us driving almost 3,500km across country… with no place to live!*

    * – a story I’ll save to regale you with when I’m over there for a pint

    “Organising your own move rather than paying professionals is SO much more fun.”

    Have done it twice (but luckily, only in town)…yep. 😉
    (I can’t believe how many trips it took just for what was in the kitchen alone!)

    “But it’s over now, and I’m not moving ever again. Ever.”

    I’m of the same mind. It will be either by box (coffin) or urn. 🙂

    “Not when there’s somewhere selling beer for £2.60 a pint on the doorstep.”

    Sigh. I have to make do with my own man shed/pub, if it ever gets bloody finished.

    Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. North Shields and even Tynemouth are pretty decent Sourdough free. I have to go to the wonderful Northern Rye in the Ouseburn for mine.

        Liked by 1 person

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