THE BRIDGE OVER THE ATLANTIC

Here’s some views for you, then.

A bridge over the Atlantic, apparently, and a canon primed (?) to attack deliveries of craft beer. Oh, and a lovely garden in which to enjoy the mist descending.

This is Clachan Seil, one of the most romantic sounding settings for a GBG entry which hove into view just as Mrs RM’s patience with Google was waning.

Seil is a slate island of 551 souls, none of whom were manning the souvenir shop so I can’t offer Seil rock slate as a prize in my next quiz.

The unpronounceable Tigh-an-Truish looks like it could house the entire population of the island.

What a wondrous sign !

Matthew Lawrenson is available on a consultancy basis to identify that font.

We take a seat close to the bar and hope those beams hold the bar up for another 300 years or so.

It’s charming, and now food service is over just a haven for local drinkers and tourists wanting a cup of tea. I wonder if one of them will wander over to the piano and knock out a few Glen Campbell tunes for Mrs RM.

Nope. We get the Steve Wright Show, and Joni Mitchell singing about the island being turned into a parking lot for visitors to the Oban craft beer festival or something.

Another Jarl, sharp and crisp and touching NBSS 3. But the pub, as you’ll see, was pushing a 4.5.

Now, time to check into our luxury accommodation for the night.

6 thoughts on “THE BRIDGE OVER THE ATLANTIC

  1. I remember going in here in 1985 and being served some Ye Olde Traditional Hearty Scotch Broth masquerading as beer šŸ˜¦

    Fortunately it sounds as though they’ve changed the cask since then.

    Lovely setting, though.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do wonder if the (normally) lone handpump is there as an indicator of provenance of the pub, something the place uses to promote its credentials. Or whether they sell a barrel in 4-5 days and because no-one actually complains (much harder in Covid times anyway) they keep putting it on.

      None of the beer in these pubs was really undrinkable, just utterly pointless.

      Like

      1. That may have worked in the ’90s (Deuchars was quite popular for a while) but on this trip I never actually saw another pint poured or delivered, bar a lone pint of Orkney in Oban on Friday evening. I guess a bit of digging would reveal some cask stats for Scotland (probably skewed by the 2019 CAMRA AGM in Dundee !).

        Like

Leave a Reply to pubcurmudgeon Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s