MOULIN BROWN

Some things I appreciated about Scotland on this trip…

  1. It’s always sunny
  2. Complete disinterest in the Rugby World Cup among locals
  3. Fewer lorries on the dual carriageways
  4. Train stations mandatory within a mile of any GBG pub

That’s a civilised country, if you ask me.

OK, there aren’t masses of trains, but just enough to make BRAPA (de)basing himself in Perth or Dunkeld in 2030 a viable option.

The Moulin Inn brew pub is 22 minutes walk from Pitlochry Station, or 19 for folk without long hair to weigh them down.

Moulin is gorgeous. Enjoy this video of a babbling brook leading to the hotel entrance.

This is what Americans visit for
Fairytale entrance

One clue as to who can afford to stay here, and it ain’t me or Si.

Straight down the middle

It could be one of those National Trust pubs, the Bretforton or Stourhead of the North, with the homebrew a middle class affectation.

No, not a real person sitting in the window

But it had a bit of character, and a near absence of overpowering menus, laminated or paper.

That’s the wine list

The Moulin pump clips are weird, but I liked the attempt to obscure them with jars of Double Deckers and cookies. There may have been a machine to deep fry them out back.

Your weeks calories
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Bold fonts

I think that, as with the Queen’s visit to the Bridge at Topsham, the idea is you buy a pack of ales to take home, rather than actually drinking them there.

I fancied the seat by the fire,

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Fire

so I let the man go in front of me, where to my horror I realised he’d never been in a pub before and had no idea how to order food and drinks. I never learn.

My own purchase of a half of Light (it was a long day) was barely simpler, as a complete lack of coinage meant a barman having to drive to Perth to get my 20p change.

The ale was lightweight and watery (NBSS 2), but let’s not be churlish, it was worth £1.80 to sit in front of the fire and listen to gentlefolk ask what was in the neeps and tatties.

The piped music was playing at such a low volume that it defeated my “Name That Tune” app.

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Homebrew

And in the Gents I found a challenger to the Evelyn and Crabtree dominance of posho pubs.

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25 thoughts on “MOULIN BROWN

  1. It’s not quite true to say there is a total lack of interest in RWC in Scotland; it just doesn’t last so long due to the national team’s distressing inability to survive beyond the group stage.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. At last -a pub I have been to -I seem to recall I had a rather splendid Yorkshire pudding (of course ) filled with delicious stew.It was Winter when we went there & it was dark & atmospheric -love this part of Scotland

    Liked by 2 people

      1. There was snow when we were there -we were staying at a resort near Gleneagles courtesy of some “richer than us ” chums who have some sort of holiday bond (don’t understand how it works,but sometimes we get “free ” holidays ,which generally escalate in cost with flights,beer prosecco etc )

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  3. The Moulin beer has always been a bit homebrew, but they really got it wrong with the names; the Braveheart sold on the name (and isn’t that great) when the Ale of Atholl was the best tasting beer by a wide margin.

    The lowering of the drink driving limit in Scotland is ensuring that all the rural outlets in the GBG are trending to being public transport accessible. Those are probably the only ones selling cask in any case.

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    1. Scott,
      “The lowering of the drink driving limit in Scotland is ensuring that all the rural outlets in the GBG are trending to being public transport accessible” – but is that because public transport accessible pubs are the only ones active members now know or because those active members think that GBG owners will only be able to get to public transport accessible pubs or both ?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Scott,
        Not just Scotland.
        In my branch it’s the pubs in the two main towns that get most of the visits and votes, or to be more precise the pubs with several beers on in the two main towns

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Er, I think the answer there must be a ‘no’.
        And with the branch allocation being reduced by nearly a third over the next three years there must be serious doubts as to how much longer it will be in.

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      3. Er, I think the answer to that must be a ‘no’.
        And with the branch allocation being reduced by nearly a third over the next three years there must be serious doubts as to no much longer it will be in.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Just catching up on the 15 blogs you’ve posted since I nipped out for a pint of milk. This pub is a cracking building in a lovely area but the beer is as you and Scott describe. I know all you really want is a Brewer’s Fayre in Glenrothes.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. But the slightly stronger one was pretty good down the road in Blair Atholl.

      My photos of cask being purchased in Scottish pubs are being sent for authentication to the chap who proved the Surgeons photo of Nessie was genuine.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. “it was worth £1.80 to sit in front of the fire and listen to gentlefolk ask what was in the neeps and tatties” –This is a good summary of what your blog is all about for me; the beer is a factor, to be sure, but it’s the unique experiences of all these far flung visits– the odd and unrepeatable little details– that really count in the end.

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    1. You could say that Americans pay £20 to walk round an old house at Windsor and they don’t even get a cup of tea!

      Pubs let you in for free and for a few pounds you get a nice seat, fire, tat and can eavesdrop on weird conversations. Easy choice.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Mark,
      That’s the only two good things about this time of year, sat in front of a proper pub fire and the chance of a pint of Old Tom in Stockport.

      Liked by 1 person

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