HIGH HOPES, HIGH TABLES IN NEW MILLS

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A motley collection of photos from New Mills, home to the second of our trio of modern micros.

Charles and I pressed on without the good company of Paul, though with a photo of his legendary map for company.

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Proper pub memorabilia

The walk along the Peak Forest Canal is surprisingly flat, but compensates with views quite scary to residents of East Dereham and Greater Waterbeach.

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Handy for the hills
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Proper OS extract

We enjoyed striding past a group of youngsters at Lower Greenshall Lane, though had to relinquish our lead to answer nature’s call a few yards on.

Industrial New Mills, a scruffy but lovely town, welcomed us at dusk.

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Could be Ancoats

I’ve written before about my love for the town, which seemed exotic to a 32 year old Fen Boy back in 1997, with its mills and fading Robinson’s liveries.

Who could have dreamt back in 1997 that New Mills would get its own micropub with fine wines, Havana cigars and plants in a bike basket ?

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Ooh look, prominent display of opening times

You’re not in Herne now, Tonto.

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Spot the difference.  Yes, it’s a can of Lupuloid in the original

Another micro aiming at a wider appeal than “blokes in their 50s“.

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Blokes

But with a more beery focus that Malt Disley.

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No Tets here either, Paul

Quite a good atmosphere, really, and decent enough Brass Castle (NBSS 3), though you’d have guessed that.

The problem is purely size. This is where Charles and I had to sit.

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Just NO

Better than standing ?

Possibly. I couldn’t feel comfortable, anyway.

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Says it all

Charles made best friends with the couple precariously perched next to him, and a conversation about cat smells, rabies and Brexit ensued.

I explored the toilet, which will have its advocates, and its detractors.

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Whichever
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Paul can finish the limerick

Clearly a boon for the town, but you can see my issue with micropubs.  

And it’s not that they’re too big.

 

35 thoughts on “HIGH HOPES, HIGH TABLES IN NEW MILLS

    1. Aye, agreed. They’re perhaps becoming the indoor answer, to the see-saw bench-table combos, which torment us in pub gardens.

      Will no one allow us simple comfort, anywhere?

      Liked by 2 people

  1. “The walk along the Peak Forest Canal is surprisingly flat,”

    I’m going to get in before Russ with the observations…the whole point of canals is that they’re flat…in between the bits where the locks are!

    Also, no mention of the only real reason for visiting New Mills…the Swizzels sweet factory!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I grew up the other side of Stockport and fondly remember that we always used to get a large sack of sweets donated by Swizzels to our school events! (and not even in return for getting into a strange man’s car…)

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You can thank the Luftwaffe for that, bombing them out of their East London factory in 1940 and sending them to a disused wick factory in New Mills.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Did you know, that the hat tax, or hat duty, was a tax levied by the British Government from 1784 to 1811 on men’s hats. The tax was introduced during the first ministry of Pitt the Younger and was designed to be a simple way of raising revenue for the government in a rough accordance with each person’s relative wealth. It was supposed that the rich would have a large number of expensive hats, whereas the poor might have one cheap hat or none at all.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Reg,
        On our Proper Days Out we often get folk from Luton, now resident in Sheffield, and Stockport.
        I’m quite sure they could tell you a thing or two about hats.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Sir, with respect, drawing from my vast, though admittedly unresolved catalogue, of general know-it-all, facts of interest etcetera, corroborated – corroboree – a sacred or warlike assembly of aboriginals – may I remind you of the exploits of one William Barker of Manchester? In the 1890s, Billy cleared a canal thirty-five feet wide, making a running jump, jack-knifing into a second, to land, perfectly dry, on the other side. My inventory of hat-related facts is similarly detailed, but I would be grateful for any further information kindly supplied by your friends.

        Liked by 1 person

      1. I only resided in Romiley for a short six month period – post university.

        A nice little town, with several Robbie’s pubs. One of my aunts still lives there.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. A “whichever ” toilet fills me with dread -there are reasons that ladies like their own loo.A 1 toilet micro pub is not ideal -the Cellars in Maidstone has a very fine ladies loo complete with individual towels for hand drying -we can be civilised in The Stone occasionally !

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Best in Winter really,as it is a bit sad to be in a cellar when the sun is shining no matter how good the beer is ! Can’t vouch for the quality of the Gents though !

        Liked by 2 people

  3. A beer connoisseur from the north
    Would travel all day on a horse
    In rain sleet or hail
    For Export Pale Ale
    In a pub with Humphrey’s rules in force

    But it’s a John Smiths not a Sam Smiths beer mat so I had best stick to the day job !

    Liked by 2 people

  4. “…Though he’d rather have cask Bass, of course.”

    Those wall-mounted tables are probably the smallest such surfaces I’ve ever seen! “I’d like to set down my packet of crisps here but alas, there’s no room.” But I suppose they’d say they’ve got no choice, given the limitations of space?

    Liked by 1 person

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